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Developing high-affinity protein capture agents and nanotechnology-based platforms for in vitro diagnostics

Citation

Rohde, Rosemary (2009) Developing high-affinity protein capture agents and nanotechnology-based platforms for in vitro diagnostics. Dissertation (Ph.D.), California Institute of Technology. http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechETD:etd-06032009-230415

Abstract

In this thesis, I describe projects that were aimed at improving ways to capture proteins for clinical diagnostics. Nanoelectronic sensors, such as silicon nanowires (SiNWs), can provide label-free quantitative measurements of protein biomarkers in real time. One technical challenge for SiNWs is to develop chemistry that can be applied for selectively encoding the nanowire surfaces with capture agents, thus making them sensors that have selectivity for specific proteins. Furthermore, because of the nature of how the sensor works, it is desirable to achieve this spatially selective chemical functionalization without having the silicon undergo oxidation. This method is described here and provides a general platform that can incorporate organic and biological molecules on Si (111) with minimal oxidation of the silicon surface.

The development of these devices is, in part, driven by early diagnosis, treatment, monitoring, and personalized medicine— all of which are increasingly requiring quantitative, rapid, and multiparameter measurements. To begin achieving this goal, a large number of protein biomarkers need to be captured and quantitatively measured to create a diagnostic panel. One of the greatest challenges towards making protein-biomarker-based in vitro diagnostics inexpensive involves developing capture agents to detect the proteins. A major thrust of this thesis is to develop multi-valent, high-affinity and high-selectivity protein capture agents using in situ click chemistry. In situ click chemistry is a tool that utilizes the protein itself to catalyze the formation of a biligand from individual azide and alkyne ligands that are co-localized. Large one-bead one-compound (OBOC) libraries of peptides are used to form the body of these ligands, also providing high chemical diversity with minimal synthetic effort. This process can be repeated to identify a triligand, tetraligand, and so forth. Moreover, the resulting multiligand protein capture agents can be produced in gram-scale quantities with designed control over chemical and biochemical stability and water solubility. This is a general and robust method for inexpensive, high-throughput capture agent discovery that can be utilized to capture the relevant biomarker proteins for blood protein diagnostics.

Item Type:Thesis (Dissertation (Ph.D.))
Subject Keywords:alkylation; carbonic anhydrase II; chlorination; click chemistry; electrochemistry; non-oxidative; one-bead one-compound libraries; peptides; silicon
Degree Grantor:California Institute of Technology
Division:Chemistry and Chemical Engineering
Major Option:Chemistry
Thesis Availability:Public (worldwide access)
Research Advisor(s):
  • Heath, James R.
Thesis Committee:
  • Blake, Geoffrey A. (chair)
  • Smolke, Christina D.
  • Beauchamp, Jesse L.
  • Heath, James R.
Defense Date:27 May 2009
Author Email:rohde (AT) caltech.edu
Record Number:CaltechETD:etd-06032009-230415
Persistent URL:http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechETD:etd-06032009-230415
Default Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:2429
Collection:CaltechTHESIS
Deposited By: Imported from ETD-db
Deposited On:08 Jun 2009
Last Modified:26 Dec 2012 02:51

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