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MEMS technology and devices for a micro fluid dosing system

Citation

Meng, Ellis Fan-Chuin (2003) MEMS technology and devices for a micro fluid dosing system. Dissertation (Ph.D.), California Institute of Technology. http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechETD:etd-05182003-163704

Abstract

Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology has matured to the point where practical biological and chemical applications are possible. One particularly active research area is in the development of lab-on-a-chip type systems. In order to create successful lab-on-a-chip and other microfluidic systems, it is necessary to have the capability of controlling and directing fluid flow. Such functionality can be found on the front end of a microfluidic system and is known as a fluid delivery or dosing subsystem. For a MEMS micro fluid dosing system to be realized, several components are necessary. The essential components include a fluid actuator, a fluidic control device, and micro plumbing. A prototype fluid delivery system is demonstrated here using a micropump as the fluid actuator, a thermal flow sensor as the fluidic control device, and micromachined couplers as plumbing. The technology to build these components has been developed and each of these components have been fabricated and tested. A prototype constructed of discrete components has also been demonstrated. A truly integrated, channel-based fluid dosing system can be achieved through device scaling.

Item Type:Thesis (Dissertation (Ph.D.))
Subject Keywords:flow sensing; MEMS. microfluidics; micro pump; parylene; silicone rubber
Degree Grantor:California Institute of Technology
Division:Engineering and Applied Science
Major Option:Electrical Engineering
Thesis Availability:Public (worldwide access)
Research Advisor(s):
  • Tai, Yu-Chong
Thesis Committee:
  • Tai, Yu-Chong (chair)
  • Scherer, Axel
  • Pine, Jerome
  • Burdick, Joel Wakeman
  • Pickar, Kenneth A.
Defense Date:31 January 2003
Author Email:ellis (AT) mems.calech.edu
Record Number:CaltechETD:etd-05182003-163704
Persistent URL:http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechETD:etd-05182003-163704
Default Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:1852
Collection:CaltechTHESIS
Deposited By: Imported from ETD-db
Deposited On:19 May 2003
Last Modified:28 Jul 2014 23:55

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