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Tissue Engineering Active Biological Machines: Bio-Inspired Design, Directed Self-Assembly, and Characterization of Muscular Pumps Simulating the Embryonic Heart

Citation

Azizgolshani, Hesham (2013) Tissue Engineering Active Biological Machines: Bio-Inspired Design, Directed Self-Assembly, and Characterization of Muscular Pumps Simulating the Embryonic Heart. Dissertation (Ph.D.), California Institute of Technology. doi:10.7907/2C8T-TB84. http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechTHESIS:05232013-150116734

Abstract

Biological machines are active devices that are comprised of cells and other biological components. These functional devices are best suited for physiological environments that support cellular function and survival. Biological machines have the potential to revolutionize the engineering of biomedical devices intended for implantation, where the human body can provide the required physiological environment. For engineering such cell-based machines, bio-inspired design can serve as a guiding platform as it provides functionally proven designs that are attainable by living cells. In the present work, a systematic approach was used to tissue engineer one such machine by exclusively using biological building blocks and by employing a bio-inspired design. Valveless impedance pumps were constructed based on the working principles of the embryonic vertebrate heart and by using cells and tissue derived from rats. The function of these tissue-engineered muscular pumps was characterized by exploring their spatiotemporal and flow behavior in order to better understand the capabilities and limitations of cells when used as the engines of biological machines.

Item Type:Thesis (Dissertation (Ph.D.))
Subject Keywords:Bio-inspired Design, Biological Machines, Impedance Pump, Muscular Pump, Tissue Engineering
Degree Grantor:California Institute of Technology
Division:Engineering and Applied Science
Major Option:Bioengineering
Thesis Availability:Public (worldwide access)
Research Advisor(s):
  • Gharib, Morteza
Thesis Committee:
  • Gharib, Morteza (chair)
  • Dabiri, John O.
  • Fraser, Scott E.
  • Ravichandran, Guruswami
Defense Date:6 May 2013
Non-Caltech Author Email:hesham.azizgolshani (AT) gmail.com
Record Number:CaltechTHESIS:05232013-150116734
Persistent URL:http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechTHESIS:05232013-150116734
DOI:10.7907/2C8T-TB84
Default Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:7747
Collection:CaltechTHESIS
Deposited By: Hesham Azizgolshani
Deposited On:03 Jul 2014 20:53
Last Modified:26 Apr 2019 18:21

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