CaltechTHESIS
  A Caltech Library Service

I. On the application of a laser to high speed photography. II. Torsional magnetoelastic waves in a circular cylinder

Citation

Fourney, Michael E. (1963) I. On the application of a laser to high speed photography. II. Torsional magnetoelastic waves in a circular cylinder. Dissertation (Ph.D.), California Institute of Technology. http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechETD:etd-12082005-131705

Abstract

The first part of this thesis deals with the application of a ruby laser to high speed photography. The light that is emitted from a ruby laser is monochromatic, collimated, coherent, linearly polarized, and highly intense. It has been demonstrated that these properties make the laser a very useful tool for research in areas involving photographic techniques.

A method has been devised by which the output of the laser is controlled and is emitted in the form of a series of light pulses. The rate at which these pulses are generated can be controlled and repetition rates of over 1.6 Mc/sec have been achieved. The 30 nsec duration of an individual pulse represents the exposure time for a high speed laser camera which has been developed. Pictures have been taken at rates of over 1.2 million frames per second. This exposure time represents a reduction of an order of magnitude over that previously possible, with an increase of three orders of magnitude in intensity. In applications where a particular characteristic of the laser light is required, such as the monochromatic nature desired in photoelasticity, this improvement of four orders of magnitude is further increased.

When a series of light pulses is generated in the manner described above it is found that the amplitude of the pulse train becomes stable above a certain critical frequency. This critical frequency is determined to be a function of the laser cavity length. The amplitude of the stabilized pulse train is a function of the repetition rate and the cavity length. The nature of this variation is established and a mechanistic explanation of the phenomena involved is presented.

Item Type:Thesis (Dissertation (Ph.D.))
Degree Grantor:California Institute of Technology
Division:Engineering and Applied Science
Major Option:Aeronautics
Thesis Availability:Public (worldwide access)
Research Advisor(s):
  • Ellis, Albert T. (advisor)
  • Sechler, Ernest Edwin (advisor)
Thesis Committee:
  • Unknown, Unknown
Defense Date:1 January 1963
Record Number:CaltechETD:etd-12082005-131705
Persistent URL:http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechETD:etd-12082005-131705
Default Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:4860
Collection:CaltechTHESIS
Deposited By: Imported from ETD-db
Deposited On:09 Dec 2005
Last Modified:26 Dec 2012 03:12

Thesis Files

[img]
Preview
PDF (Fourney_me_1963.pdf) - Final Version
See Usage Policy.

9Mb

Repository Staff Only: item control page