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Part I. Effect of hydrogen peroxide oxidation on the antigenicity of ovalbumin, bovine serum albumin, and rabbit gamma globulin. Part II. Cortical discontinuity and propagation of spreading depression

Citation

Terres, Geronimo (1956) Part I. Effect of hydrogen peroxide oxidation on the antigenicity of ovalbumin, bovine serum albumin, and rabbit gamma globulin. Part II. Cortical discontinuity and propagation of spreading depression. Dissertation (Ph.D.), California Institute of Technology. http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechETD:etd-06302004-112033

Abstract

PART ONE

Three proteins were treated with solutions of hydrogen peroxide under a variety of conditions. The resulting products were soluble, heat stable, and showed some increase in heterogeneity of electrophoretic components. Osmotic pressure determinations indicated a marked reduction in number average molecular weights, and intrinsic viscosity studies showed increased frictional ratios for the treated proteins. UV absorption of the treated proteins indicated extensive oxidation of the tryptophane, tyrosine and phenylalanine residues in the protein. Chromatographic studies indicated that cystine and cysteine were oxidized to cysteic acid. Immunochemical investigation of the H2O2 treated proteins showed: (1) That treated ovalbumin had lost all its native specificity, and that treated bovine serum albumin and rabbit gamma globulin retained only traces; (2) Each protein apparently developed a new specificity as a result of treatment, but the antigenicity of such proteins was very low. Tests employed were the development of precipitins in rabbits and chickens, and Schultz-Dale and gross anaphylaxis in guinea pigs.

PART TWO

An investigation into the possible mechanism underlying the propagation of Leao's spreading depression (S.D.) was conducted in rabbits by cutting the cortex in chronic experiments and thus destroying neuronal continuity. The-slow potential change (S.P.C.) concomitant with S.D. had been postulated as the agent of transmission in a manner similar to the nerve action potential associated with nerve conduction. It was found in this investigation that neither the S.D. or the S.P.C. crossed the cut even though in some cases the scar was only 0.1 mm thick and the cortical edges were well approximated. A small potential change was recorded as crossing the cut, but it was never instrumental in initiating a S.D. It was therefore concluded that either neuronal continuity or localized microfields smaller in radius than the scar are involved in the transmission of S.D. The possibility of a chemical agent being involved in the transmission of S.D. was not eliminated by these experiments.

Item Type:Thesis (Dissertation (Ph.D.))
Degree Grantor:California Institute of Technology
Division:Biology
Major Option:Biology
Thesis Availability:Public (worldwide access)
Research Advisor(s):
  • Campbell, Dan Hampton
Thesis Committee:
  • Unknown, Unknown
Defense Date:1 January 1956
Record Number:CaltechETD:etd-06302004-112033
Persistent URL:http://resolver.caltech.edu/CaltechETD:etd-06302004-112033
Default Usage Policy:No commercial reproduction, distribution, display or performance rights in this work are provided.
ID Code:2785
Collection:CaltechTHESIS
Deposited By: Imported from ETD-db
Deposited On:30 Jun 2004
Last Modified:26 Dec 2012 02:54

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